Lesson Plans

The FOSSter Creativity team researched several software applications, put them to use on educational tasks and developed lesson plans that can be used in your classrooms. Please feel free to borrow from our resources. These plans are meant to generate ideas as to how this software application can enhance your curriculum.  In a collaborative gesture, we will welcome your innovative lesson plans into our expanding resource center and assign you credit for your contribution.

Please forward your lesson plans to lessons@picassoknew.com


Elementary Plans


Starry Night: gpaint

Teacher: Cheryl Catherwood                  

Grade Level: 4th/5th Grade

Brief History and Background:  Vincent Willem van Gogh was born on March 30, 1853 in a small village in Holland. He was the son of Anna Cornelia Carbentus and Theodorus van Gogh, a Protestant minister. The family had connections in the art world and at age 16, van Gogh was apprenticed to an art dealership.  He is a Dutch painter, classified as a Post-impressionist, and is generally considered one of the greatest painters in the history of European art. His work shows the objects, people and places in his life with bold, and visible dotted or dashed brushmarks, which are intensely coloured. He produced all of his work (some 900 paintings and 1100 drawings) during the ten year period before his death in July of 1890.  Most of his best known work was produced in the final two years of his life, and in two months before his death he painted 90 pictures.  

Standards: 

9.1.5.A   Elements color • form/shape • line • space • texture • value

Principles Visual Arts:  balance • contrast • emphasis/focal point • movement/rhythm • proportion/scale • repetition • unity/harmony

9.1.5.C. Identify and use comprehensive vocabulary within each of the arts forms pertaining to Aboriginal Art and the didgeridoo.

9.2.5.C. Relate works in the arts to varying styles and genre and to the periods in which

 they were created.   

9.3.5.E. Interpret and use various types of critical analysis in the arts and humanities.

• Contextual criticism

• Formal criticism

• Intuitive criticism

Goal: To create a digital painting in the style of Vincent Van Gogh's Starry Night.

Objectives:

1. Students will learn about the artwork of Vincent van Gogh, in particular his style of painting.

2. Students will be introduced to the program gpaint.

3. Students will further their knowledge of how artwork can be created by using the computer to create their own digital landscape painting.  

4. Students will create a digital landscape painting in the style of Vincent van Gogh.

Supplies/Materials: Mid grade Epson photo paper, CD or Zip Disk                    

Teacher Preparation:

 - Teacher will bring in a tri-fold poster with images of Van Gogh's Paintings.

 - Teacher will bring in books of Van Gogh's paintings.

 - Teacher will bring in a large poster of Van Gogh's Starry Night.

 - Teacher will create a visual aid poster of the tools and functions used in gpaint. 

-  Teacher will bring in a color copy of Starry Night for each student.

Introduction to Lesson: The teacher will welcome the class. The teacher will tell the class that today we will be learning about Vincent van Gogh and his painting Starry Night.  The teacher will show the students examples of van Gogh's work and ask them their interpretation of the paintings. The teacher will go into further detail about Van Gogh and his work, how he painted, the brush strokes he used and his color palate. The teacher will also bring in examples of landscapes and non-landscape paintings.  The teacher will ask the students, what makes a landscape painting a landscape and will go into further detail about the differences between landscape painting and other forms of painting. The teacher will introduce the program gpaint and explain to the students that they will be using gpaint to create their own digital landscape painting in the style of van Gogh.  The teacher will go over the tools used in the gpaint program using the visual aid poster.

Directions:

1.     Have students sit at their computers and get accustomed to the tools of gpaint.

2.     Go to File and select NEW.

3.     Set you document page 8 Inches by 10 Inches. Not Pixels!!

4.     Go to File SAVE AS and save your file to the desktop under your name.

5.     Start by using the paint tool and make short brush strokes.  Experiment with the color palate.   

6.     Look at the color copy of Starry Night for color choice and inspiration.

7.     Once you feel comfortable with the tool palate select the pencil tool and set the line width to 1 or 2.

8.     With the pencil tool draw only the outline of your landscape.  Look at you color copy for reference.

9.     Select SAVE from the toolbar menu.

10.     When finished the outline change over to the Brush tool and set the line width to 3 or 4.

11.     Use short brush strokes to create you painting.

12.     When finished, tell Miss Catherwood and we'll print your van Gogh inspired   landscape!

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

- Have the students display their work on a table in the classroom.

- Did the student take time or rush through the project?

- How well does the student's work represent Vincent van Gogh?

- The students can discuss what they liked or disliked about the project.

- The students can respond to each other's work

Time Allotment:

Three 45-minute Class period and One 25 minute class period

Class One:

                        10 minute introduction of Vincent van Gogh

                        15 minute introduction of gpaint program

                        20 minutes for students to get accustomed to the computer program

Class Two:

                        5 minutes recap

                        35 minutes for working

                        5 minute clean up

Class Three:

                        35 minutes for working/ printing

                        10 minute critique

Vocabulary:

Post Impressionist- A school of painting in France in the late 19th century that rejected the objective naturalism of impressionism and used form and color in more personally expressive ways.

Landscape- a genre of art dealing with the depiction of natural scenery.  

References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_van_Gogh

http://www.atai.org/gpaint/screenshot.jpg

References to D.B.A.E.          

- Art Production- The students were engaged while making their own computer

 version of Starry Night.

- Art History- The students will learn about Vincent van Gogh along with

Postimpressionistic painting.

- Art Aesthetics- The students will talk about the beauty and design of Vincent van Gogh's work.


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Tux Paint Lesson Plans:

One Fine Day – Shape Painting using Tux Paint

Teacher:  Mary Pat Coyle

Grade Level:  2nd and 3rd

Brief History and Background:  The class, as a group has read One Fine Day by Nonny Hogrogian and discussed the shapes that made up the main character, the red fox.  In these illustrations, the fox was simply depicted with shapes easily identified. 

The class has also completed a unit on shapes and a unit on colors and is now starting to look for these elements in their environment.  The software Tux Paint was used to reinforce shape and color throughout the unit so the child also learned to manipulate the tools in the software application.  In this lesson, the children’s’ picture book, One Fine Day provided the motivation for this more advanced exploration of shapes and depicting an environment using Tux Paint.

Standards:

9.1.3.A: Know and use the elements and principles of the visual art form to create works in the arts and humanities, color and shape.

9.1.3.B: Recognize, know, use and demonstrate a variety of appropriate arts elements and principles to produce, review and revise original works in the arts, Shape, line. Color, objects, text, paint brush and stamps to create an image

9.1.3.C: Know and use fundamental vocabulary within each of the arts forms.

Goal: To create a Tux Painting that includes the image of a red fox created from at least 3 different shape tools and the color red with an imaginative background using any of the tools that Tux Paint offers.

Objectives:

Students will learn to recognize and identify shapes in their environment

Students will manipulate electronic tools to create shapes and to get desired effect

Students will become more confident with technology

Students will create a painting  of the red fox in an imaginative environment

Resource Materials/Visual Aides: 

The story the Little Red Fox by Nonny Hogrogian

Shape displays from unit plan

Color wheel display from color unit plan

Student work displayed that shows previous shape and color exploration on Tux Paint

Displayed exemplars of animals created with Tux Paint shape tools

Supplies/Materials:

Computers with Tux Paint software installed

Printer and paper

Teacher Preparation: 

Prepare display boards and exemplar

Check that computer, software and printer are all working properly

Replenish paper

Teaching:

Teacher and students will review shapes using the display boards

Teacher and students will review color using the display boards

Introduction:

Read the story, One Fine Day

Ask children to look closely at the fox and identify the shapes they see in his body

Tell the students that they will be using Tux Paint to paint a scene with the red fox as the primary character.

Show exemplars

Directions:

While at their desks, with a piece of paper and crayons, have students draw the fox using different shapes for the parts of the body, make the book available to the students. 

When they have at least one good idea for creating the fox, have each student go to a computer where Tux Paint is running and a blank canvas is set

Have students begin by first selecting red form the palate

Then they select a shape tools and practice placing them and then undoing them

Next the students begin to create their red fox.

When the students have successfully completed a red fox with at least 3 different shapes, ask them to create a background using all the tool and colors available to them

When finished they can print and hang on the wall

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

If there is time, teacher can call for a critique of the work where children talk about the shapes that the students chose to describe the fox and to talk about the whole picture.

Evaluation should be made based on whether or not he child was able to follow the directions for creating the fox in three shapes of red color.

Time Budget: 1 - 45 minute class

Vocabulary:

Names of the shapes: circle, square, triangle, rectangle, oval

Names of colors: red, yellow, blue, green, orange, violet, white, black and brown

Computer tools: shape tool, line tool, stamp, magic wand, undo tool, text tool, eraser

Computer commands: save, print, open, close

Safety Concerns:

Proper posture while at the computer

Bibliography/References:

One Fine Day by Nonny Hogrogian

Credit to Amy Jared of the Russell Byer School for her inspiration to use the One Fine Day and the character, the red fox, as a motivation for to explore shapes.


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I Can Write with My Eyes Shut: A Tux Paint Lesson Plan

Teacher: Stacey Atkinson

Grade Level: Elementary

Standards:

9.1.B,D,G,H,J

9.2.A,C

9.3.A,B,D

9.4.B,D

Goal:

To have students create a picture on the computer and then write

Learning Objectives:

To have students look at and think cognitively about the ________________. To have students practice the psychomotor skills necessary for creating ___________ inspired by the artwork shown.

Requirements:

Students will learn about using their imaginations.

Students will create a picture with Tux Paint.

Students will write a story about the picture they created.

Students will collaboratively critique and review each other's work.

Resource Materials/Visual Aids:

Computers with Tux Paint, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut by Dr. Seuss.

Supplies:

-Pencils

-Markers

-Story Pages

Teacher Preparation:

Create examples.

Download Tux Paint and learn how to use it.

Configure the program. Make sure to disable the print option.

Gather materials.

Teaching/Time Budget:

2-3 classes

Day 1:

Introduction 10-15 minutes

- Read Story

- Talk about Imagination

- Talk about art in the Book.

- How does Art make a Story Better?

- What comes first the Art or the Story?

- Discuss the proper way to handle the computer and its hardware.

Student Work Time 25-30 minutes

- Short demonstration of Tux Paint

1. Show how to start the page

2. Show how to use the tools

3. Show how to erase or undo

4. Show how to save

5. Leave out printing until the end (disable the print setting by configuring the programs before class)

- Let Students play with the program for a while

- By the end of class they should have a picture

Day 2:

Reminders 10 minutes

- Does anyone remember anything about the story we read last week?

- Brief reminder of how to work Tux Paint and how to handle the computer hardware.

Student Work Time 30-35 minutes

- Let students finish or re-create their picture

- Print their picture and write their names on them

Day 3:

Reminder and Directions 40-45 minutes

- Hand back pictures

- Hand out story pages

- Have students write a story about their picture

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

The students will be able to get up in front of the class and describe their artwork and the other students will offer constructive comments and ask questions.

Extensions:

If students finish early they can make a frame for their story page.

Vocabulary:

Line, Mouse, Fill, Stamp

Safety Concerns:

None for the kids, plenty for the computers.

References:

Dr. Seuss. 1978. I Can Read With My Eyes Shut. Beginner Books, Random House Books: Toronto.


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It Happened in the Park One Day: A Tux Paint Lesson Plan

Teacher: Melissa Antler

Grade Level:2

Brief History and Background:

This lesson is inspired by Dr. Suess' book; "And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street". The assumption of this plan is that the classroom may only have one or two computer work stations. Students can take turns working at the computer station(s) while other projects are on-going. The goal is to introduce the students to the art of telling a story with pictures (illustration). This lesson will also give students an introduction to art-making electronically. The teacher can create a common background for this project or allow each student to create an image from scratch. The teacher must be able to evaluate the student's readiness to work on the computer.

Standards:

9.1.2 A Know and use the elements and principles of each art form to create works in the arts.

9.1.2 B Recognize, know, use and demonstrate a variety of appropriate arts elements and principles to produce, review and revise original works in the arts.

9.1.2 C Know and use fundamental vocabulary within arts forms.

9.1.2.E Demonstrate the ability to define objects, express emotions, illustrate an action or relate an experience through creation of works in the arts.

9.3.2 B Describe works in the arts comparing similar and contrasting characteristics.

9.3.2 C Classify works in the arts by forms in which they are found (e.g., farce, architecture, graphic design).

9.4.2 D Recognize that choices made by artists regarding subject matter and themes.

National Education Technology Standards:

Technology productivity tools: Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.

Basic operations and concepts: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems. Students are proficient in the use of technology.

Goal:

Students will create an illustration using TuxPaint. The illustrations will be combined into a classroom storybook.

Learning Objectives:

Students will narrate an event that they want to illustrate.

Students will draw upon personal experiences and imagination to produce ideas.

Students will produce an illustration on computer.

Students will demonstrate knowledge of computer/software use.

Experiment with colors and textures as allowed by the medium.

Materials:

- Paper and pencils

- Computer with TuxPaint installed

- 8.5 x 11in sheets of paper

- Three hole punch

- Three paper fasteners

Visual Aids:

"And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street," by Dr. Suess. Background image of park. Exemplar: teacher's event that occurs at the park.

Teacher Prep:

Get a copy of "And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street," by Dr. Suess. Familiarize yourself with TuxPaint. Create park scene background in TuxPaint. Make exemplar.

Introduction:

What is an illustrator? An illustrator is someone who tells a story with pictures. Can you think of some different kinds of places where we see illustrations? (books, comic strips, etc.). S/he decides the who, what, where and when. This includes all the details of the picture, for example, what color are the shirts of the people; do they have stripes or poka dots? Are they long sleeve or short? What about their pants, shoes and hair? Choose an event that you would like to see at the park. For example, a juggler is juggling hippo's. Have the students brainstorm with you all the things they might see (real or imagined) at the park. Think about the details. Fill up the space! Each picture should tell a different part of the story.

Directions:

1. Demonstrate how to use TuxPaint and how to save work.

2. Dispense paper and pencils to students.

3. Have each child decide on his/her event.

4. Write one sentence description about his/her event.

5. Draw preliminary sketch.

6. Use sketch as a guide while working on computer.

7. Display for critique and analysis.

Closure:

Each student will produce an illustrated panel.

Critique/Evaluation/Assesment:

-Have students display finished pieces.

-Give each student the opportunity to discuss his/her contribution.

-Give each student the opportunity to discuss the challenges of the project.

-Give students an opportunity to ask questions about each other's event.

Time Allotment:

- 5-15 minute introduction to project

- 10-15 minutes to develop ideas

- 10 minute demo on TuxPaint.

- 20-30 minutes to execute picture in TuxPaint each student.

- 10 minutes evaluation

Vocabulary:

illustrate: Pronunciation: 'i-l'-"trAt also i-'l'- Function: verb Inflected Form(s): -trat·ed; -trat·ing Etymology: Latin illustratus, past participle of illustrare, from in- + lustrare to purify, make bright -- more at LUSTER transitive senses.

1. obsolete a : ENLIGHTEN b : to light up

2. archaic : to make illustrious b obsolete (1) : to make bright (2) : ADORN

3. to make clear : CLARIFY b : to make clear by giving or by serving as an example or instance c : to provide with visual features intended to explain or decorate; illustrate a book

4. to show clearly : DEMONSTRATE - intransitive senses : to give an example or instance

detail: Pronunciation: di-'tA(&)l, 'dE-"tAl Function: noun Etymology: French détail, from Old French detail slice, piece, from detaillier to cut in pieces, from de- + taillier to cut -- more at TAILOR

1. extended treatment of or attention to particular items

2. a part of a whole: as a : a small and subordinate part : PARTICULAR; also : a reproduction of such a part of a work of art b : a part considered or requiring to be considered separately from the whole c : the small elements that collectively constitute a work of art d : the small elements of a photographic image corresponding to those of the subject

3. selection of a person or group for a particular task (as in military service) b (1) : the person or group selected (2) : the task to be performed

Safety Concerns:

Proper posture.

References:

Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/

"And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street," by Dr. Suess


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Tux Paint Animal Profiles

Teacher:  Katherine Flook

Grade Level: 3rd-5th (depending on level of prior technology experience)

Time Budget: 3-4 45 min periods depending on class size and overall level of computer experience in the class

 Brief History and Background:   This is an inter-disciplinary lesson which could be done collaboratively with a science teacher during a time when students were studying animals and their habitats in class. This lesson is intended to get students to encourage students to experiment with all the different drawing tools in Tuxpaint (including the text feature, color palette, various options to create different textures and line thicknesses, etc). Also, this will be a chance for students to get some practice using the internet as a research tool.

Standards (NETS for students):

 - Technology communications tools:  Students use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences

- Technology research tools:  Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources

- Technology productivity tools: Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.

- Technology productivity tools:  Students use productivity tools to collaborate in constructing technology-enhanced models, prepare publications, and produce other creative works 

Goal:  To create an animal profile (using template) with illustrations that demonstrate use of various tools in Tux paint program as well as information about diet and habitat based on internet research.

 Objectives:

-Students will practice conducting research on the internet and effectively communicating the results of this research to others.

- Students will practice computer skills, including improving hand-eye coordination involved in using a computer graphics program

- Students will become more familiar with the basic tools used in computer graphics programs

- Students will learn about animals and their habitats and diets

- Students will practice representational drawing with computer graphics software

Resource Materials/Visual Aids:

- example of printed out research on an animal, showing important information about habitat and diet highlighted/underlined

- example of finished animal profile

Supplies/Materials:

1.    Tuxpaint program (can be downloaded for free)

2.    Animal template (use template included with this lesson, or make your own with Tux program)

3.    Enough computers with internet access & web browsers for each student

4.   Color printing capabilities

Introduction:

Discuss animal habitat and diet. See if students can come up with a list of habitats and what animals might live in each habitat. Ask students if they can give examples of what these animals’ diets might be. Write these on large sheet of paper on board so that when students go to technology lab, it will be possible to bring this for students to look at as a reference. Show students example of finished animal profile, pointing out the habit and diet sections. Explain that this was created using a computer graphics program called Tux paint and that everyone is going to get to make their own profiles using this program.

Assuming that students have already been in the media lab and used computers for word processing and web browsing, proceed to media lab and have everyone open the internet browser on their computer.

Directions:

Day1:

1. introduction

2. have students go to askJeevesforkids (have this website bookmarked ahead of time so that all students need to do is go to bookmarks and select the site)

3. in the search field have students look up “mammal” “amphibian” or “bird”

4. at the top of the page, there will be “Where can I find out about the” and a dropdown box with lists of animals. Tell students to choose an animal from the list and click on the link.

For example: I type in “bird.” Then I select “flamingo” and a webpage with information on the flamingo’s habitat, diet, and images of the flamingo.

 5. After the students have gotten this far, have them print out the page of information with at least one image of the animal and its habitat.

6. Next, have students underline the animal’s name, the name of the habit (i.e. lagoon, grassland, tundra, rainforest), and examples of the animal’s diet (i.e. fish, seeds and berries, shoots and roots)*

*if by the end of the period there are still students struggling with this, have them do this with parents as homework

Day 2:

1.     Have students open animal template in Tuxpaint. (have this saved already, so students can simply click “open” and select the template)

2.     students will use the text tool to fill in the name of their animal, its habitat, and its diet

3.     they will use the rest of the drawing and manipulation tools to draw images of their animal, its habitat, & diet

4.     *when every child has finished, the projects can be printed out and displayed as a group

 *if possible, it would be nice to laminate each student’s project or make duplicates of each project and compile them into a class book

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

Each child can stand up in front of the class one at a time and show the class their project while explaining what they learned about the animal and what they drew.

Did the student like using Tux paint or would he/she have preferred to draw with “real” pencils, markers, etc.? Why or why not? What was fun? What was frustrating or hard to do?

Vocabulary: habitat, diet, mammal, amphibian, internet search, tool bar, computer graphics

Safety Concerns: make sure students are supervised while using the internet. They should only be using the sites specified for their research

Bibliography/References:

Standards from:  National Educational Technology Standards NETS for students

Tux Paint information and download: Tuxpaint website


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Save the Trees! Earth Day Posters

Teacher:  Sarah Wenner

Grade level: 2nd

History/Background:  Posters have been used and are still used to promote and support popular activities.  They are made to visually stimulate people to look at them and provide the viewer with knowledge about the activity being promoted.  Toulouse-Lautrec made poster images about popular French clubs and Roger Broders made posters promoting travel to different vacation destinations.  Posters are made for mass reproduction and distribution.  With today’s digital technology we no longer have to physically reproduce poster images, we can digitally create them and they are ready for mass distribution through the internet.

Standards:

- Basic operations and concepts: Use input devices (e.g., mouse, keyboard, remote control) and output devices (e.g., monitor, printer) to successfully operate computers, VCRs, audiotapes, and other technologies

- Social, ethical, and human issues: Work cooperatively and collaboratively with peers, family members, and others when using technology in the classroom

- Technology productivity tools and Technology problem-solving and decision-making tools: Use technology resources (e.g., puzzles, logical thinking programs, writing tools, digital cameras, drawing tools) for problem solving, communication, and illustration of thoughts, ideas, and stories

- Technology communications tools: Gather information and communicate with others using telecommunications, with support from teachers, family members, or student partners.

Goal:  To make a digital poster with Tuxpaint to promote Earth Day.

Objectives:  Students will:

- research the earth day tradition

- learn the Tuxpaint program

- work in groups to create an earth day poster

- digitally distribute their earth day poster

- learn about Toulouse-Lautrec and Roger Broders posters

Requirements:  To work in an assigned group to make an earth day poster using the Tuxpaint software then digitally distribute the poster to family, friends and throughout the school.

Resource Materials/Visual Aids: 

- examples of posters by Toulouse-Lautrec

- examples of posters by Roger Broders

- Tuxpaint software

- Earth Day websites for research

Supplies/Materials:

- computers

- Tuxpaint software

Teacher Preparation:

- gather visual aids

- gather supplies

- create exemplar 

- make list of Earth Day websites

- design Tuxpaint demo

Introduction:  What is Earth Day all about?  What are some activities that we do on Earth Day?  Has anyone ever been to an Earth Day Festival?  How do we know when and where an Earth Day Festival is happening?  Posters let us know when different activities are happening.  Show Toulouse-Lautrec and Roger Broders posters and explain how posters are made to be reproduced in large quantities and distributed to the public.  Talk about the elements in the posters that catch our eyes so we look at them, and what information about the activity is written on the poster.  Talk about some of the images and words that might be on an Earth Day poster.  One of the ideas that Earth Day presents is the idea of saving the trees and technology is a good way to promote saving trees and the planet.  Without trees we don’t have oxygen so it is important to have them.  We can save the trees by digitally reproducing our posters so we don’t have to print them on paper.  We can send them through email and put them on websites to let people know about our activity.  Divide students into groups of two for the project.

Directions: 

1.     Begin Gathering email addresses for distributing your promotional poster (including family, friends, and Earth Day websites.

2.     In your groups research the Earth Day tradition and some of the popular activities and themes.

3.     Choose a theme and talk about some ideas for a poster such as images (photographic or drawn in Tuxpaint) and words that you would like to include.

4.     Explore the Tuxpaint software and so a first draft of your poster, just for practice.

5.     Make your final draft and save it onto a CD.

6.     Email your poster to the email addresses you have collected (if you do not have an email address I will provide one for distribution).

7.     Print out a copy of your poster. (We will make a few copies to hang in the school).

8.     You and your partner will hang several of your posters around the school.

 Closure: 

 - students will turn in their CD to the teacher.

- students will email their poster to the teacher.

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

-  Critique:  As a class we will look at the posters and each group will have a chance to talk about their theme and the elements in their posters.

-  Project evaluation:  As a class we will choose one poster to send to the local news paper.

Extensions:

Students that finish early can research more Earth Day topics to make a person poster for themselves or they can make a poster to promote a topic of their choice.

Time Budget:  4-45 minute classes

Vocabulary:

- Earth Day- A day devoted to celebrate the earth and the conservation of our planet.

- conservation- a careful preservation and protection of something

- reproduction- to copy something over and over again in order to have many copies that are exactly alike.

- distribution- to give something to many people.

- email- a system for sending messages to people electronically

- Tuxpaint- software used to make digital art.

- software- a set of programs that can be downloaded, or put onto, a computer

- promotion- the act of making something known.

Bibliography/References:

Earth Day Network : http://www.earthday.net/

International Earth Day: http://www.earthsite.org/

Kid’s Domain Earth Day: http://www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/earthday/

U.S. Governmental Portal Earth Day for Kids: http://www.earthday.gov/kids.htm

Kids in Action: http://earthday.wilderness.org/kidsstuff/

Kids for Saving Earth: http://www.kidsforsavingearth.org/


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First Tux Painted Color Wheel

Teacher:  Mary Pat Coyle

Grade Level:  2nd and 3rd grade

Brief History and Background:

The students are still novices with the program, Tux Paint , but they have had the opportunity to explore the tools in free play and some loosely structured activities.  This lesson will have 3 phases: first the students will explore 3 basic shapes and colors, second, the students will create a color wheel with just colored circles and the third, the students will create a color wheel with six circles on a triangular base. 

The students have been learning about color and shapes through traditional media and the Tux Paint lesson is meant to provide another opportunity to explore color theory and basic shapes

Standards:

9.1.3.A: Know and use the elements and principles of the visual art form to create works in the arts and humanities, color and shape.

9.1.3.B: Recognize, know, use and demonstrate a variety of appropriate arts elements and principles to produce, review and revise original works in the arts, Shape, line. Color, objects, text, paint brush and stamps to create an image

9.1.3.C: Know and use fundamental vocabulary within each of the arts forms.

Goal: The students will create a color wheel using color circles in primary and secondary colors arranged on a triangle base.

Objectives:

Students will learn to identify primary and secondary colors

Students will manipulate electronic tools to create shapes and to get desired effect

Students will become more confident with technology

Students will create a color wheel that is arranged to show the placement of primary colors and the secondary colors

Resource Materials/Visual Aids:

Shape displays from unit plan

Color wheel display from color unit plan

Student work displayed that shows previous shape and color exploration on Tux Paint

Displayed exemplars of color wheels

Supplies/Materials:

Computers with Tux Paint software installed

Printer and paper

Teacher Preparation:

Prepare display boards and exemplar

Check that computer, software and printer are all working properly

Replenish paper

Teaching

Teacher and students will review primary and secondary color using the display boards

Teacher and students will review shapes using the display boards

Introduction:

Show the exemplar color wheels and explain that we are going to create one that looks the same

Review primary colors

Review secondary colors and the primary colors that create them

Directions:   Phase 1, class 1:

While at their desks with a piece of paper and crayon, have students draw shapes and use primary colors

Have each student go to a computer where Tux Paint is running and a blank canvas is set

Ask students to choose the shape button from the left set of tool and go to the right set of tools and choose the filled circle.

Choose the color yellow from the palette at the bottom of the screen,

Draw a yellow filled circle

Following procedures above, draw an outline yellow circle

Following procedures above, draw a filled red square

Following procedures above, draw an outline red square

Following procedures above, draw a filled blue triangle

Following procedures above, draw an outline blue triangle

 Phase 2, class 2:

While at their desks with a piece of paper and crayon, have students draw circles in an arranged circular pattern that reflects the exemplar, use primary  and secondary colors

Have each student go to a computer where Tux Paint is running and a blank canvas is set

Ask students to choose the shape button from the left set of tool and go to the right set of tools and choose the filled filled circle

Choose the color yellow form the palette at the bottom

Draw a yellow filled circle at the top of the picture

Choose the color red form the palette at the bottom

Draw a red filled circle at the bottom right of the picture

Choose the color blue form the palette at the bottom

Draw a blue filled circle at the bottom left of the picture

Choose the color orange form the palette at the bottom

Draw a orange filled circle between the yellow and red circle

Choose the color violet form the palette at the bottom

Draw a violet filled circle between the red and blue circle

Choose the color green form the palette at the bottom

Draw a green filled circle between the blue and yellow circle

Phase 3, class 3:

While at their desks with a piece of paper and crayon, have students draw circles in an circular pattern arranged on a triangle base that reflects the exemplar, use primary and secondary colors

Have each student go to a computer where Tux Paint is running and a blank canvas is set

Ask students to choose the shape button from the left set of tool and go to the right set of tools and choose the filled circle

Choose the color black form the palette at the bottom

Draw a black outline circle a little bigger than a quarter at the top point of the triangle (all circles will be drawn to the same size as the first

Draw a black outlined circle at the bottom right of the triangle

Draw a black outlined circle at the bottom left of the triangle

Choose the magic wand tool from the left tool bar

Choose the color yellow from the palette at the bottom

Touch the magic wand to the inside of the top circle

Choose the color red form the color palette picture at the bottom

Touch the magic wand to the inside of the bottom right circle

Choose the color blue from the color palette at the bottom

Touch the magic wand to the inside of the bottom left circle

Explain that they have just arranged the primary colors on the color wheel

Choose the color black from the color palette at the bottom

Draw a black outlined circle between the yellow and red circles

Draw a black outlined circle between the red and red blue circles

Draw a black outlined circle between the blue and yellow circles

Choose the magic wand tool from the left tool bar

Choose the color orange from the palette at the bottom

Touch the magic wand to the inside of the circle between the yellow and red circles

Choose the color violet from the color palette picture at the bottom

Touch the magic wand to the inside of the circle between the red and blue circles

Choose the color green from the color palette at the bottom

Touch the magic wand to the inside of the circle between the blue and yellow circles

Explain that they have just arranged the secondary colors on the color wheel

Choose the color black from the color palette at the bottom

Choose the magic wand tool

Touch the magic wand to the background

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:.

Evaluation should be made based on whether or not he child was able to follow the directions for creating the color wheels over the three stages of the lesson

Evaluation should be made on how the student improved in the manipulation of electronic tools

Time Budget:  3- 45 minute classes

Vocabulary:

Names of the shapes: circle, square, triangle

Primary colors

Secondary colors

background

Names of colors: red, yellow, blue, green, orange, violet,

Computer tools: shape tool, filled shape tool, outline shape tool, undo tool, color palette

Computer commands: save, print, open, close

Safety Concerns:

Proper posture while at the computer

Bibliography/References:

Color theory books for children


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Grocery il-LIST-ration: A TuxPaint Lesson Plan

Teacher:  Lauren Parker

Grade Level:  1 and 2 grade

Brief History and Background: Tux Paint is a free drawing program designed for young children (kids ages 3 and up).  It has a simple, easy-to-use interface, fun sound effects, and an encouraging cartoon mascot who helps guide children as they use the program. It provides a blank canvas and a variety of drawing tools to help your child be creative (About, 2006).  This lesson plan’s focus is to have students learn the basics of tux paint while creating their own graphic illustrations. 

Standards:

Students demonstrate a sound understanding of the nature and operation of technology systems.

Students are proficient in the use of technology

Students understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology.

Students practice responsible use of technology systems, information, and software.

Students develop positive attitudes toward technology uses that support lifelong learning, collaboration, personal pursuits, and productivity.

Technology productivity tools:

Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.

Students use productivity tools to collaborate in constructing technology-enhanced models, prepare publications, and produce other creative works.

Technology communications tools:

Students use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences.

Students use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences (Technology Foundation Standards for All Students, 2005).

Goal: Each student will create an illustrated “grocery list” using tux painting, shapes, rubber-stamping, and line tools.  

Objectives:

Students will use their imaginations to come up with a dream grocery list based on their favorite foods.  

Students will further develop hand eye coordination needed to navigate the computer mouse and keyboard. 

Students will learn the basics of a simple graphics program. 

Resource Materials/Visual Aids:

-A finished exemplar for the final project. 

-The Paint program. 

-Plastic toy food for reference. 

Supplies/Materials:

-Above listed Visuals.

-A computer lab with enough units for the entire class (if not available, then students can collaborate on their lists and work in teams).

-A color printer or printers. 

Teacher Preparation:

The teacher should become familiar with the Tux paint program ahead of time and feel comfortable with the software and its tools.   An exemplar of an illustrated, imaginary grocery list should be made ahead of time.  The computer lab should be set up for the class ahead of time as well, with Tux paint installed and working on all available machines.  The printer(s) should have enough color ink to accommodate the class’ work.  

Introduction/Teaching:

Introduce the lesson by discussing grocery lists.  Driving questions: if you went shopping for your own groceries, and had all the money in the world, what would you buy?  What are your favorite foods?  What are your least favorite foods?  What do you wish you could eat every day?  What is healthy to eat?  What is not healthy?  Would you buy healthy foods?  Junk food?  A little of both?  The point of this discussion is to get the kids inspired.  The next step will be to work with tux paint.  Explain the different painting, line, stamping, and shape tools.  Have the students familiarize themselves with the program and practice using each tool.  Once they seem to be comfortable with it, they should begin their imaginary grocery lists, illustrating the different types of food they would buy, through the various tools they have learned.  

Directions:

1.  Create an illustrated grocery list. 

2.  Make sure to use each of the below listed Tux Paint tools:

-Lines

-Painting

-Shapes

-Stamping

3.  When you are done, print it out to share with the class

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

As a final critique, each student will show off his/her grocery list and explain what is listed and why.  He/she will also need to point out which Tux Paint tools were used for each illustration. 

 Students will be graded on their ability to follow directions.  Each student is expected to have a finished illustrated list using all of the required Tux Paint tools.

Time Budget: 2- 30 minute class periods

Day 1:

10-minute introduction.

20-minute experimentation with program.

Day 2:

5-minute review

25-minute class period for creating final project. 

Vocabulary:

Graphic:

1.    A pictorial device used for illustration.

2.    A graphic display generated by a computer or an imaging device.

Bibliography/References:

Tux Paint, (2006). About. Retrieved Mar. 09, 2006, from new breed software Web site: http://www.newbreedsoftware.com/tuxpaint/ .

ISTE, (2005). Technology foundation standards for all students. Retrieved Mar. 09, 2006, from ISTEnets Web site: http://cnets.iste.org/students/s_stands.html.


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Fantasy Landscapes: A TuxPaint Lesson Plan

Teacher: Laura Maier

Grade Level: 3rd Grade

Brief History and Background:

Landscape is an artwork that depicts scenery such as mountains, rivers, oceans, buildings, foliage, the sky etc.  They can be made in many different styles such as realism, impressionism, surrealism, and abstraction. Artists such as Courbet, Monet, Dali, and Paul Klee painted landscapes in their own unique styles and serve as good examples for this project. Landscapes can also be made with in different mediums including painting, photography, printmaking, and using computer programs.

Standards:

9.1.3.J: Know and use contemporary technologies for producing works in the arts.

9.2.3.L: Identify, explain and analyze common themes, forms and techniques from works in the arts.

9.3.3.F: Know how to recognize and identify similar and different characteristics among works in the arts.

9.4.3 C: Recognize that the environment of the observer influences individual aesthetic responses to work in the arts.

Goal: To create a fantasy landscape using Tux Paint.

Objectives:

*   Students will become familiar with the tux paint program.

*   Students will learn about the tradition of landscape art.

*   Students will creatively combine elements of landscape design.

Resource Materials/Visual Aides:

Paint program: www.tuxpaint.org

Supplies/Materials:

Computers with Tux Paint

Color printer

Paper

Teacher Preparation:

Become familiar with the computer program.

Gather images of landscapes: countryside, cityscape, under the sea, outer space, etc.

Introduction:

Ask students what they know about landscape. Have them define the term in their own words. Show them images of landscape art that depicts different settings and styles. Ask students about the different styles and mediums used by artists. Discuss the impact of digital technology on traditional art. Traditional formats can be explored using recent technology. Familiarize the students the different elements of Tux paint especially undo and redo feature.

Directions:

1. Ask students to do some preliminary sketches to think about what elements of landscape they would like to use. Think about creating a place where you would love to be. In countryside, in a city, on another planet, or any combination of ideas.

2. Allow students some time to explore tux paint.

3. Start working on final version of fantasy landscape. Remind them to be imaginative.

Time Budget: 2 class periods: One to introduce the lesson, test out the programs, and start the project and another to finish the landscapes, print, and discuss.

Vocabulary:

Landscape- artwork that uses scenery from the outdoors

Horizon- where the sky meets the land

Safety Concerns:

No safety concerns

Bibliography/References:

http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/kl/landscape.html



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Digital Stained Glass: A TuxPaint Lesson Plan

Teacher: Beth Heaney

Grade Level: 3rd grade

History/ Background:

The medium of stained glass has been an art form since the Middle Ages.   Stained glass windows in cathedrals served a dual purpose.  They told biblical stories in a pictorial way for a mostly illiterate audience, as well as being beautiful decorations. 

Tux paint is an open source software program.  It is a drawing and painting program, with setup being geared to younger children.  It is akin to the commercial Microsoft paint, but easier to use for younger children.  

Standards:

9.1.3.A.Know and use the elements and principles of each art form to create works in the arts and humanities.

9.1.3.F. Identify works of others through a performance or exhibition (e.g., exhibition of student paintings based on the study of Picasso).

9.1.3.B.Analyze how historical events and culture impact forms, techniques and purposes of works in the arts (e.g., Gilbert and Sullivan operettas)

Goal: To create a piece of digital stained glass using tux paint. 

Objectives:

1.    Students will create stained glass-like compositions. 

2.    Students will understand the element of line. 

3.    Students will become familiar with the program Tux paint.

4.    Students will be introduced to the technique of stained glass. 

5.    Students will learn the element of composition.   

Cognitive: Students will learn about the action of creating a composition.

Psychomotor: Students will use computers to create a workable whole image. 

Affective: Students will study line and composition. 

Requirements: Students will create a piece of digital stained glass using tux paint. 

Visual Aids: Reproductions of historical and contemporary stained glass. 

Supplies and Materials:  Computer, with installed Tux paint software, Internet connection. 

Teacher Preparation:  A slideshow of stained glass works, as well as an exemplar of the completed project. 

Introduction: 

Briefly explain to the students the techinique of traditional stained glass: Cutting and breaking of the glass, encasing in lead, soldering. Show students examples of stained glass pieces throughout history.  Demonstrate how to use the tux paint program, explain that the class is making “digital stained glass”.   

Directions:

Using the medium thick line tool on tux paint, create a linear composition.  Fill in the shapes made with color to create a piece of “stained glass”. 

Closure:

Have students print out their works and do a quick critique, pulling out the strongest images.  Discuss line and composition, and how they make compositions strong. 

Extensions: Students who finish early should be encouraged to do an image search for stained glass. 

Time Budget:

15-minute intro, 5-minute demo, 20-minute work time, 5-minute critique

Vocabulary:

Composition:  the artistic arrangement of the parts of a picture

Line:  a contour or outline considered as a feature of design or composition

Abstract:  art that does not attempt to represent external, recognizable reality but seeks to achieve its effect using shapes, forms, colors, and textures.

References:

www.artchive.com

http://www.aisg.on.ca/

http://www.metmuseum.org/explore/Tiffany/listsgw.htm

http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/s/images/standglas_winchester.lg.jpg

http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/s/stainedglass.html


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A Tux Paint Lesson Plan

Teacher: Peter Coyle

Grade Level: 4

Brief History and Background: Tux Paint is a free and easy to use painting program for children. 

Standards:

9.1.4  Production

9.2.4  Historical and Cultural Contexts

9.3.4  Critical Response

9.4.4  Aesthetic Response

Goal: Students will be introduced to the Tux Paint program, and use it to create an image and manipulate it, and then save 4 files that show the process of

Objectives:

•  Students will be introduced to creating images using a computer.

•  Students will learn to use a a mouse as a drawing tool

•  Students will have the opportunity to express themselves through their choice of subject.

Resource Materials/Visual Aides: Exemplar

Supplies/Materials:

•  Computer, Printer

•  Tux Paint

Teacher Preparation: Create an exemplar, and load Tux Paint onto the computers.

Introduction:

Survey the students to determine their knowledge of computers, and if they use any drawing programs at home.  Present Tux Paint software.

Directions:

Draw an image, and then use four different tools to change, manipulate the image.  Save each change as a different file, use exemplar to help explain this part of the assignment

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

Because this assignment is meant as an introduction to a new process, the emphasis is on exploration.  Students will print out, or if a projector is available display, their drawings.  Students will be encouraged to explain the tool they used and to what effect.

Time Budget: 45 min

Vocabulary:

Software Written coded commands that tell a computer what tasks to perform. For example, Word, PhotoShop, Picture Easy, and PhotoDeluxe are software programs.

Safety Concerns: none

Bibliography/References:

http://www.newbreedsoftware.com/tuxpaint/download/

http://schoolforge.org.uk/index.php/Tux_Paint

http://www.geocities.jp/ono_tetsu/tuxpaint/


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Secondary Plans


Blender Lesson Plans:

Virtual Quest #1: Blender-Monkey Head

Teacher: Aleksandr Degtyarev

Grade Level: 9-12

  •  

Brief History and Background:

Blender is the open source software for 3D modeling, animation, rendering, post-production, interactive creation and playback. Available for all major operating systems under the GNU General Public License.

Originally, the program was developed as an in-house application by the Dutch animation studio NeoGeo (not to be confused with the NeoGeo game console) and Not a Number Technologies (NaN); the main author, Ton Roosendaal, founded NaN in June 1998 to further develop and distribute the program. The program was initially distributed as freeware until NaN went bankrupt in 2002.

The debtors agreed to release Blender as free software, under the terms of the GNU General Public License, for a one-time payment of €100,000. On July 18, 2002, a Blender funding campaign was started by Roosendaal in order to collect donations and on September 7, 2002 it was announced that enough funds had been collected and that the Blender source code would be released. Blender is now an open source program being actively developed by the Blender Foundation.

The popularity of Blender has reached approximately 250,000 users using Blender worldwide, and support is widely available. Most users learn Blender through tutorials that various users have written, others learn Blender through many discussion forums on the topic. A popular forum for Blender discussion is Elysiun (http://www.elysiun.com).

A primate (L. prima, first) is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, apes, and humans. The English singular primate is a back-formation from the Latin name Primates, which itself was the plural of the Latin primas ("one of the first, excellent, noble"). Colin Groves lists about 350 species of primates in Primate Taxonomy.

All primates have five fingers (pentadactyly), a generalized dental pattern, and a primitive (unspecialized) body plan. Another distinguishing feature of primates is fingernails. Opposing thumbs are also a characteristic primate feature, but are not limited to this order; opossums, for example, also have opposing thumbs. In primates, the combination of opposing thumbs, short fingernails (rather than claws) and long, inward-closing fingers is a relic of the ancestral practice of brachiating through trees. Forward-facing color binocular vision was also useful for the brachiating ancestors of humans, particularly for finding and collecting food. All primates, even those that lack the features typical of other primates (like lorises), share eye orbit characteristics, such as a postorbital bar, that distinguish them from other taxonomic orders. 

A monkey is any member of two of the three groupings of simian primates. These two groupings are the New World and Old World monkeys of which together there are nearly 200 species. Because of their similarity to monkeys, apes such as chimpanzees and gibbons are sometimes incorrectly called monkeys. Also, a few monkey species have the word "ape" in their common name. Because they are not a single coherent group, monkeys do not have any important characteristics that they all share and are not shared with the remaining group of simians, the apes.

Monkeys range in size from the Pygmy Marmoset, at 10 cm (4 inch) long (plus tail) and 120 g (4 oz) in weight to the male Mandrill, almost 1 metre (3 ft) long and weighing 35 kg (75 lb). Some are arboreal (living in trees), some live on the savanna; diets differ among the various species but may contain any of the following: fruit, leaves, seeds, nuts, flowers, insects, spiders, eggs and small animals.

Some characteristics are shared among the groups; most New World monkeys have prehensile tails while Old World monkeys do not; some have trichromatic colour vision like that of humans, others are dichromats or monochromats. Although both the New and Old World monkeys, like the apes, have forward facing eyes, the faces of Old World and New World monkeys look very different though again, each group shares some features such as the types of noses, cheeks and rumps. To understand the monkeys, therefore, it is necessary to study the characteristics of the different groups individually.

The name monkey may come from a German version of the Reynard the Fox fable, published in around 1580. In this version of the fable, a character named Moneke is the son of Martin the Ape. The word Moneke may have been derived from the Italian monna, which means "a female ape." The name Moneke persisted over time likely due to the popularity of Reynard the Fox.

A group of monkeys may be referred to as a mission of monkeys or a tribe of monkeys.

Standards: Teach Student Software Interface for 3D modeling, Animation (Blender).

Goal: Student will familiarize themselves with Blender Interface by searching for Pre-installed Monkey Template, and augmenting it to their hearts content.

Objectives:

Students will familiarize themselves with a layout to a very powerful 3D program. They will use their curiosity and intuition to find the monkey template. There is no right or wrong way to get to it.  Naturally the first student to find this template will share their rout to discovery. However, it does not stop there. Students must now figure out how to individualize the monkey by augmenting its features using the countless tools of the program.

Students will use their eyes and hands in this process of interface interaction.

Students will learn that there is no one way to get to a result and that community based learning will yield quicker ways to get to a destined goal. They will observe that only once they get to that objective goal can the process of individuation begin.

Resource Materials/Visual Aides:

Tutorial Book

VLC MEDIA PLAYER

Interface Tutorial AVI. Video:

Official Blender Site

elYsiun - Official Blender User Support Forum

BlenderNation - Fresh Blender News, Every Day

Links to Blender Sites from the Official Blender Site

Blender Development Wiki

Video Tutorials for Modem Users

Greybeard's Video Tutorials Site

Blender plugin repository

BlenderWars - Large Number of Sci-Fi Blender    models/galleries/forums

Blender photo gallery

Blender Battles - Speed modelling contests

Blender Projects - OPEN Movie Project Community

ResPower Super/Farm Blender Render Farm 

Supplies/Materials:

One computer per student equipped with Blender Software. VLC Player. Tutorial Video. And Headphones.

Teacher Preparation:

Download Software (Blender). Make sure it is the current update version as new versions come out almost every month now. Familiarize themselves with program interface by doing tutorials. Research background and history. Make a worksheet for students on simple key interface that they may refer to and investigate.  Make screen shots of example (the monkey), so students know that it exists. Download any necessary video, image files that may facilitate better learning. Refer to Avi video presentation. Make sure all computers are equipped with proper software to run all programs.

Introduction: Who likes free stuff? Well what if I was to tell you that an equivalent to a several thousand dollor program that you may have heard of called: MAYA exists?

It is an Open Source program developed for people like us who don’t have several thousand dollars to dish out on programs. Why or what is open source? Why learn a 3D program? Who can tell me the benefits and draw backs of this way of thinking? Who can tell me why they think the monkey is the symbol that is used in this program as a template example?

Software is not the only field affected by open source; many fields of study and social and political views have been affected by the growth of the concept of open source. Advocates in one field will often support the expansion of open source in other fields, including Linus Torvalds who is quoted as saying, "the future is open source everything."

The open source movement has been the inspiration for increased transparency and liberty in other fields, including the release of biotechnology research by CAMBIA and the encyclopedia named Wikipedia, as well as later projects. The open-source concept has also been applied to media other than computer programs, e.g., by Creative Commons. It also constitutes an example of user innovation (see for example the book Democratizing Innovation). Often, open source is an expression where it simply means that a system is available to all who wish to work on it.

Directions:

1.   Open the Program Blender.

2.   Drag-n-Drop interface.avi file into VLC player.

3.   Watch/follow tutorial first 10min.

4.   Now try to find the monkey template.

5.   Whoever finds it first must share with the class how they found it. Pay attention. Do not randomly click buttons. Observe what each button does.

6.   once the monkey is found SAVE project to DESKTOP.

7.   Now explore further to make the monkey look different.

8.   Record the process you used to change the monkey’s appearance. SAVE.

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

Time Budget: (2 classes)

Intro: 20-30 minutes

Hands on: w/Video 20-40minutes

Discussion/Critique

Vocabulary:

3D animation, modeling

Render

Open Source

Primate

Freeware

Interface

Template

Safety Concerns:

No food Drinks Near computers.

No touching computer screen with hands.

Bibliography/References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

Official Blender Site

Greybeard's Video Tutorials Site


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Pop Art Revised: Gestalter 

Teacher:  Sarah Wenner

Grade level: 9th

History/Background:  The popularity of digital art is a reaction to, and ever growing with our culture.  The digital art that we use is fascinating because we're still discovering new, unheard-of art forms and we watch in awe as older art forms evolve and grow into styles never before seen.  Vector art is among these growing digital art styles and can be considered a digital version of Pop Art.  In the 50’s Pop Art erupted in much the same fashion as Vector Art is now. Pop Art developed as a reaction to the growing economy and the ability to reproduce projects and images.  Both Pop Art and Vector Art use bold outlines and flat colors creating two dimensional images in a cartoon like way.

Vector Art

                            

Lullaby by Dan Wenner                          Eclipse by Dan Wenner

  

 Pop Art

            

Marilyn by Andy Warhol                      Campbell’s Soup by Andy Warhol

Standards:  Students will:

9.1.12.A:  Learn elements-color, form/shape, line, space, texture, value.  Principles- balance, contrast, emphasis/focal point, movement/rhythm, proportion/scale, repetition, unity/harmony,

9.2.12.E:  Analyze how historical events and culture impact forms, techniques and purposes of works in the arts.

9.3.12.F:  Analyze the processes of criticism used to compare the meanings of a work in the arts in both its own and present time.

Goal:  To make a digital drawing in Vector Art style from a photograph.

Objectives:  Students will:

1. learn the similarities and differences between Pop Art and Vector Art.

2. learn the Gestalter program for producing Vector Art.

3. work with a variety of geometric  elements to produce their image on the computer.

4. use a photographic image of an item that represents popular culture to create Vector Art..

5. examine art criticism of Pop Art and how it has changed since then.

6. critique their Vector Art and notice the difference between digital and traditional art critique. 

7. create a digital drawing in Vector Art style from a photograph.

Requirements:  To turn in a CD that contains the student’s Vector Art project of taking a photographic image of an item of popular culture and using the Gestalter program to produce the Vector Art image.

Resource Materials/Visual Aids:  examples of Pop Art, examples of Vector Art, Gestalter program

Supplies/Materials: Computers, Gestalter program

Teacher Preparation: gather visual aids, gather supplies, make sure Gestalter is successfully installed onto all computers

Introduction:  Ask if anyone knows what Vector Art is.  Explain what Vector Art is and how it is made.  By showing images of Vector Art, encourage students to think of other art styles that they are reminded of when looking at Vector Art.  Introduce Pop Art and explain that Pop Art began as a reaction to the popular culture of the time.  Ask students how Vector Art can be a reaction to popular culture just like Pop Art was.  Introduce students to the Gestalter program that they will be working with.  Show them the various tools, the use of geometric elements such as points, lines, curves, and polygons, and how to import an image.  Explain that they will be choosing a photographic image from our popular culture to reproduce in Vector Art style.  Remind students that highlights and shadows must be outlined with the image in order to be filled in with a darker or lighter color.

Directions:

1. Experiment all tools in Gestalter program to see what can be done and how the tools work.

2. Choose an image from popular culture to represent in the Vector Art style.

3. Import the chosen picture into Gestalter.

4. Begin to make a line drawing of the picture using the appropriate tools.  Make sure to outline highlights and shadows as desired for visual emphasis.

5. Fill in color and texture on outlined image.  You can change color and texture from the original picture if desired.

6. Create a background or other visual elements around your popular image as desired.

7. Save your Vector Art image to a CD to turn in.

 

Photograph An original photograph, a JPEG raster image.         Vector Art  Steam Locomotive 7646 as a vector-based image, originally Windows Metafile (converted to GIF for display here).

 

Closure: Students will turn in their CD to the instructor.

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

• Critique:  We will look at each image and have a formal critique comparing Vector Art and Pop Art, how critics critique each style differently because of how the two art forms differ.

• Personal Critique:  Each student will have a chance to talk about the image they chose and their experience of the process of making Vector Art.

• Project evaluation:  We will discuss the similarities and differences of Vector Art and Pop Art since our experience of making Vector Art.

Extensions: Students that finish early can do another Vector Art representation from an image of their choice, or students can do a free style drawing in the Gestalter program.

Time Budget:  3-45 minute classes

Vocabulary:

Line Drawing- a black and white drawing that creates outlines of the images in the picture.

Pop Art- art in which commonplace objects (as road signs, hamburgers, comic strips, or soup cans) are used as subject matter.

Two-Dimensional-  artwork that is flat; exhibits width and height but not depth.

Vector Art- also known as geometric modeling is the use of points, lines, curves, and polygons to represent images in computer graphics

Bibliography/References:

Wenner, D. Vector Art Gallery.  http://www.danwenner.com/gallery/vector/main.htm Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/


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GIMP: Lesson Plans

Picture it Digitally: A Study on Matisse and the Art of Collage

Teacher: Kristina Weldin

Grade Level: 7th-8th

Brief History and Background: This lesson bridges the art of collage, the hands-on cutting and pasting of pictures into a composition with digital technology using the FOSS (free/open source software) GIMP. GIMP is a photo/image manipulation software with some basic features like Photoshop, for those teachers who are on a budget. This assignment is geared towards a classroom with one computer station equipped with access to a digital camera/disk reader, color printer and scanner. Due to this limitation, this lesson can extend as a special project or an ongoing collaboration in the classroom. Students will be able to create their own digital collage self portrait in the style of Matisse using the technology and resources available on the web and by scanning taking digital images of objects which represent themselves as an artist in society today.

Henri Matisse is regarded as one of the most important French artists of the 20th century. Born on December 31, 1869 in Northern France, Matisse was the son of a middle-class family. His early painting style stemmed from a conventional form of naturalism, yet he also studied contemporary art, especially that of the impressionists. He began to experiment in his paintings, earning a reputation as a rebellious member of the "Fauvists" which focused on using color to render forms and organize spatial planes. Although his style changed through the years, he never gave up being an artist, even when he was confined to a wheelchair due to the onset of cancer. At this time he began making paper cuttings and collages creating works of brilliantly colored paper cutouts with an unfailing eye for design, on a canvas surface. Matisse became known for his bright and colorful collages. He was a perfectionist when it came to the relationship of color and shape. Although, Henri Matisse died of cancer on November 3 1954, his legacy as the "Master of Color" still inspires artists today.

Standards: 

9.1.8 Production

9.2.8 Historical/Cultural Context

9.3.8 Critical Response

9.4.8 Aesthetic Respons

Goal:

Students will create a multi-media self-portrait using one (or several) photographs of themselves while incorporating digital prints, clip art or object scans in a style based on the collage production of Henri Matisse

Learning Objectives:

-Students will learn the basics of incorporating a computer, digital camera and flat-bed scanner in their art work.

-Students will create a unique self-portrait collage, using image resources collected from the Internet and/or scanned/acquired from the digital camera.

-Students will also experience the psychomotor challenges of using a mouse/stylus to manipulate images, as well as, become actively engaged with the digital tools prevalent in the classroom.

-Students will express themselves and "Who They Are as Artists" through their choice of images, scanned objects and in the way they choose to represent themselves in the digital photograph.

-Students will acquire knowledge of Matisse and his works, and will be able to relate their own work to his.

Resource Materials/Visual Aids: Images of collages and portraits by Matisse, as printouts or in a Power Point Presentation.

Materials:

-Computer

-Scanner

-Color Printer

-Digital Camera

-Paper

-Scissors

-Glue or Glue Sticks

Teacher Preparation:

Create an exemplar, and output it at different stages of production. Familiarize yourself with the GIMP software and other tech tools utilized for this project. Have samples of work by Matisse during his collage period as well as some portraits to discuss with the class.

Introduction/Directions:

Begin a discussion of artist Henri Matisse and show samples of his art. Encourage students to point out various colors, shapes and patterns found in these pieces. Discuss the importance of color themes and composition, relating that the basic geometric shapes and colors can be found in everyday objects and advertisements. Focus on color and shape, especially the way paper was arranged to create form. Engage students in a discussion about collage, and how they can use technology to create a similar effect and composition. Have students begin to think about images or objects that represent themselves as an artist today. Students may begin to collect and research images, clip art, and digital media to be incorporated into their self-portrait collage.

The next step involves the teacher taking digital photographs of each individual student posing to be included in their digital collage environment.

The teacher then creates a project folder and within that folder each student will have their own folder with their digital picture in it.

Next, the students will take turns with scanner and computer and their first task will be to scan and create a digital collage background. Using the software GIMP, students will be able to cutout, color correct and composite their images.

The second task will be to mask the photo of themselves, and drop their image(s) into the background they have created.

Once the final collage has been completed in the GIMP program, students can printout their finished digital piece, or they may opt to print out each element and then cut and paste their final composition in the traditional sense of collage.

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

Evaluation will revolve around the creativity and craftsmanship of the overall collage, and the care taken using the tools in GIMP to add themselves into the image creatively.

Students should be able to recognize pattern, shapes and colors in everyday pictures or digital images and photographic sources found online.

Students will be able to identify sample works of the artist Matisse and understand the basics of collage making.

Time Budget:

Could be incorporated into 2 working class periods in technology-ready classrooms, otherwise utilize as an open-ended extension activity.

Vocabulary:

Henri Matisse, collage, contemporary art, impressionism, and GIMP specific terms that will have to be defined.

References:

GIMP FOSS: http://www.gimp.org

GIMP Tutorial: http://gimp.net/tutorials

Kinder Art, media collage lesson plan: www.kinderart.com/sculpture/media.shtml

European History: Matisse: http://www.european-history.com/matisse.html

The National Collage Society: www.nationalcollage.com

PA Standards: www.pde.state.pa.us


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Manipulated Media: GIMP

Teacher: Lauren Parker          

Grade Level: 8

Images affect the way we think and feel.  Advertisers are aware of this and use visual media as a way to manipulate us everyday.  Some advertisements have a positive effect on us while others have a truly negative effect.  Either way, if the ad is successful, we generally notice the product and are often tempted to buy it.  Graphic computer applications are what advertisers and designers use to make these ads.  With this project, we will learn the basics of graphic illustration and photo-manipulation in GIMP, a FOSS graphics application and create our own spoof advertisements.  

Learning Objectives:

Students will:

-Learn the basics of GIMP, a FOSS Image manipulation application.

-Analyze popular advertisements of today and the messages they are sending.

-Gain a better understanding of digital art. 

Driving Questions: What is an advertisement?  In looking at a given selection of ads, what message are they sending?  How do these images effect body image for women?  How do they affect body image for men?  How do they portray one’s role as a woman or man?  Who is this company trying to sell to?  How can you tell?  Are these ads effective?  In what way?  How are they not effective?  How do you think advertisements effect our view of the world and how things are supposed to be?  Why do you think we are drawn to certain colors and shapes?  What makes us buy products?  Without an ad, is the product as interesting, helpful, needed, etc?  Without advertisements and media, what would our culture be like?  How would gender roles and appearance expectations be effected?  

Materials Needed:

-Advertisements selected ahead of time for examples to show during class discussion.

-A selection of (kid friendly) magazines for students to find their own examples. 

-A computer lab with enough computers for each student.  If this is not available, enough computers will be needed for students to work in teams of 2 or 3. 

-Access to a scanner or, preferably, scanners. 

-Access to the Internet, for further research and a look at Adbusters magazine’s website.

-A color printer.   

Instructional Strategy: Students at this age are, generally, more affected by media and subliminal societal expectations than other groups.  Developmentally, they are also learning to expand their worldview, explore new ideas, and further develop a sense of social responsibility.  It may be helpful, then, to look at the effect advertisements and media have on the world.  Before starting this lesson, it is important for the teacher to:

A/ make sure GIMP is installed and functioning on the computers to be used. 

B/ familiarize her/himself with the software.

C/ Gather a variety of images for the discussion. 

D/ Create a finished spoof ad for use as an exemplar. 

Start the class off with a discussion on advertising using the above listed “driving questions”.   Have the class find their own advertisements in magazines and ask them to explain their choices.  What is happening in the ad that they hadn’t realized before the discussion?  After the discussion, the teacher will have the students take a look at Adbusters magazine (check ahead to make sure everything in it is appropriate for this age group) or have them go online to look through the website (again, check ahead of time for suitability).  It is now time to explain the assignment.  The students will need to use GIMP to create their own spoof ads.  They may scan in images found in magazines or on the Internet (with careful adult monitoring).  They will be expected to use a few different images from several advertisements, in a sort of digital collage effect.  The teacher should show his/her exemplar for further clarification of expectations.  The next step is to work with the GIMP software.  If they have not used GIMP before, the students will need to be taught the basics of the software and its tools.  It is essential that they know how to scan in an image, crop, distort rotate, draw, add text, work with color, etc.   It may take a few class periods to learn the program and create a finished piece.  Once the spoof ads are finished, they should be printed out, hung up and the class should have a final critique/discussion about their finished work. 

GIMP stands for “Graphical Image Manipulation Program”.  You can read more about it and download it at: http://www.gimp.org.


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Picture This: GIMP lesson plan

Teacher: Peter Coyle

Grade Level: Secondary

Brief History and Background:

My GIMP assignment assumes that my classroom has one computer with a scanner and a printer.  Because of this resource limitation I would treat this assignment as a special project or extension.  We will focus on the post modern appropriation of images in class discussion, and experience the modern technology that makes such work possible.

Standards:

9.1.12 Production

9.2.12 Historical/Cultural Context

9.3.12 Critical Response

9.4.12 Aesthetic Response

Goal: Students will create a digital multi-media self portrait using a photograph of themselves, and a painted, collage, or drawn background.

Objectives:

Students will learn the basics of incorporating a computer in their work.

Students will either paint, collage, or draw a background.  Students will also experience the psycho-motor challenges of using a mouse to manipulate an image.

Students will express themselves through their choice of materials, creation of their background, and in the way they choose to present themselves in the digital photograph. 

Resource Materials/Visual Aides:

Images of the Gorillaz, either printed out or in a Power Point Presentation.

Supplies/Materials:

Computer, scanner

Digital camera

paper

paint

drawing materials

Teacher Preparation:

Create a sample, and output it at different stages of production.  Familiarize yourself with the GIMP software.

Teaching:

Students will create a background using the media of their choice, painting, collage, or drawing. The background subject is wide open, students can create an interior, an outdoor scene, a fantasy scene... any environment that a figure could inhabit.

The next step involves the teacher taking digital photographs of each individual student posing to be included in their environment.  The teacher then creates a project folder, within that folder each student will have their own folder with their digital picture in it.

The first part of the lesson is over.  The second part of the lesson is to be used as an extension, or a carrot. Students will take turns with scanner and computer after successful completion of other projects.  Their first task will be to scan and color correct their backgrounds.  The second task will be to mask the photo of themselves, and drop their image into the background they have created.

Introduction:

Present children with images of Gorrilaz (a cartoon rock band often depicted in real photographic locations). Explain that we will be taking turns with the computer to create our own hand drawn and photographic work.

Directions:

Create background

Scan background

Take digital picture of student.

Use GIMP to combine the photograph with the background.

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment:

Evaluation will revolve around the creativity and craftsmanship of the background, and the care taken using GIMP to add themselves into the image.

Time Budget: not applicable, open ended extension activity

Vocabulary: I imagine there will be GIMP specific terms that will have to be defined.

Bibliography/References:

http://www.gimp.org/

http://gimp.net/tutorials/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gorillaz


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Computer Life: GIMP

Teacher: Danecia Berrian

Grade: 6th-12th 

History: Still-life painting was popular among the ancient Greeks and Romans (who also made still-life mosaics), but thereafter it was sidelined in European art for centuries, as art was overwhelmingly devoted to religious subjects during the Middle Ages. It reappeared during the Renaissance and became established as a distinctive branch of painting in the 17th century, flourishing first in the Netherlands, where the Reformation had discouraged religious imagery and artists were seeking new subjects. Pictures of dead animals are also covered by the term.

Standards:

9.1.5. E: Know and demonstrate how arts can communicate a story or theme.

9.3.5. H: Compare and contrast aspects of individual works using appropriate vocabulary

9.4.5. D: Explain choices made to communicate the individuals theme.

Goal: To create an open source activity for students to integrate computers into their artwork.

Requirements:

Students will learn to show craftsmanship expression and concentration

To produce an image shows use of texture, form, color, and volume

Student will make effort to meet skill objectives and goals

Student will produce a graphic design based upon a still life created

Resource Materials / Visual Aides: Gimp, Google, Photoshop, Ask Jeeves

Materials:

Brush and ink

Oil Pastels

Computers

Gimp

6x6 white paper

11x14 black paper

Teacher Prep: Teach students how to use the GIMP

Teaching Students will create a still life using the media of their choice, painting, collage, or drawing. After creating their images students will take digital photographs of their images and scan them into the computer. Students will use the gimp to distort and manipulate their image to create a different mood utilizing, texture, color, volume, and scale

Introduction: Present children with digital art images. Explain that they will be creating their own digital art utilizing the gimp software.

Directions

1. Students will use Brush and ink to create a still life drawing made out from 2 paper cups and 2 pieces of agitated styrofoam.

2. Students will draw their still life drawing again utilizing oil pastels and volume.

3. When students are done with their two creations they will utilize the computer lab and scan in their brush and ink drawings.

4. Students will use GIMP to manipulate their drawings by changing the color and appeared texture of their art.

5. Students will be expected to choose to moods, feelings, or themes and implement them in their digital art.

Closure:

1. Place projects on the back table to dry

2. Clean up supplies and work area as you finish

3. Follow additional instructions on the board until dismissal 

Critique/Evaluation/Assessment: Both the hand drawings and digital art will be displayed next to one another. Students will talk about the difference between the two and the techniques they learned and explored with to create both pieces. 

Extensions:Students will use the class camera to take digital pictures of themselves and change the mood of that picture by using color alone. 

Time Allotment Planner: 2 weeks 

Vocabulary:

Gimp

Digital Art

Texture

Volume

Scale

Form 

References: Google, Ask Jeeves, Gimp, Photoshop


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Collage For the 21st century: GIMP Lesson Plan

Teacher: Beth Heaney

Grade Level: 12th grade

History/ Background: Since Picasso glued newspaper on to his canvas, artists have been crazy for collage. With the modern advent of Photoshop, images can be seamlessly combined. GIMP was created as an open source answer to Photoshop. While it is not quite as powerful as an image manipulator, it is great for those on a budget.

Standards:

9.1.12. GRADE 12: C. Integrate and apply advanced vocabulary to the art forms.

9.1.12. GRADE 12: E. Delineate a unifying theme through the production of a work of art that reflects skills in media processes and techniques.

9.3.12. GRADE 12: G. Analyze works in the arts by referencing the judgments advanced by arts critics as well as one’s own analysis and critique

Goal: To create an image using the open source software GIMP, without the benefit of a scanner.

Objectives:

1. Students will create collage using web images.

2. Students will peruse through art history.

3. Students will become familiar with the program GIMP.

4. Students will learn image manipulation techniques, such as feathering and layers.

5. Students will learn the element of composition.

Cognitive: Students will learn about the action of creating a composition.

Psychomotor: Students will use computers to create a workable whole image.

Affective: Students will peruse images from art history.

Requirements: Students will create a collage using digital reproductions of works from art history.

Visual Aids: All visual aids will come from www.artchive.com

Supplies and Materials: Computer, with installed GIMP software, Internet connection.

Teacher Preparation: A slideshow showcasing composition and color should be prepared beforehand, as well as an exemplar of the completed project.

Introduction: Have students peruse the artchive website for images that interest them. When they have pulled some images up, have them review the artist’s biography, and any criticism in the page with the images.

Directions: Have students pull images off of artchive and digitally manipulate them to create one cohesive image.

Closure: Have students print out their works and do a quick critique, pulling out the strongest images. Discuss composition and what makes these compositions strong.

Extensions: Students who finish early should research the artists that were used in their collage with other means than the artchive.

Time Budget: 10-minute intro, 5-minute demo, 25-minute work time, 5-minute critique

Vocabulary: Composition: the artistic arrangement of the parts of a picture

References: http://www.artchive.com

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